, How ‘lonely’ Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

How ‘lonely’ Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography

Published nearly 70 years ago, it was an explosive royal memoir which made headlines around the world.

Described at the time as a work that was ‘unique in the history of literature’, the former King Edward VIII’s autobiography was published in September 1951, just months before his brother King George VI’s death.

The Duke of Windsor had a lot to talk about: his unhappy and ‘lonely’ time as King; his ‘strict’ childhood, his terrible relationship with Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin; and of course the inside story of the abdication crisis which saw him depart the throne in December 1936.

The saga centred around his desire to marry American divorcee Wallis Simpson, and Baldwin’s refusal to allow the union to take place without Edward first stepping down from his position as King.

In his ghost-written book, A King’s Story: The Memoirs of HRH the Duke of Windsor, Edward spoke of how, in believing that his ‘birth and title’ should not ‘set me apart from other people’, he felt as though he was in ‘unconscious rebellion against my position’.

The closing words of the tome centred around his decision to give up the throne so he could marry Ms Simpson.

He spoke of how ‘love had triumphed over politics’ and that although it proved to be his ‘fate’ to ‘sacrifice my cherished British heritage’, he drew comfort that the decision had ‘long since sanctified a true and faithful union’.

Royal historian Robert Jobson told MailOnline that the work was ‘much more important’ than the memoir which Prince Harry is set to publish next year – because as an ex-King, the Duke ‘had more gravitas’ than the Duke of Sussex.

Harry revealed via publisher Penguin Random House yesterday that he was writing his book ‘not as the prince I was born but as the man I have become’.

The work is expected to delve further into the breakdown in his relationship with his family and brother Prince William, which led to his and wife Meghan Markle’s decision to give up their royal duties and move to California at the start of last year.

, How ‘lonely’ Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How ‘lonely’ Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

Published nearly 70 years ago, it was an explosive royal memoir which made headlines around the world. Described at the time as a work that was ‘unique in the history of literature’, the former King Edward VIII’s autobiography was published in September 1951, just months before his brother King George VI’s death. Above: The Duke posing with the first edition of his memoirs 

, How ‘lonely’ Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How ‘lonely’ Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

The Duke of Windsor had a lot to talk about: his unhappy time as King; his ‘strict’ childhood, his terrible relationship with Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin; and of course the inside story of the abdication crisis which saw him depart the throne in December 1936. The saga centred around his desire to marry American divorcee Wallis Simpson, and Baldwin’s refusal to allow the union to take place without Edward first stepping down from his position as King. Above: The Duke and Duchess of Windsor after their marriage in Monts, France, in June 1937 

News of the Duke of Windsor’s memoir was reported in the Daily Mail on September 27, 1951.

Reviewer George Murray said in the edition: ‘He had no need to keep an ear to the keyhole, or to hide under the table to learn what the kings and queens and princes were talking about.

Wallis Simpson and King Edward VIII: A scandal that rocked a nation

January 1931 – Wallis meets Prince Edward in January 1931, after being introduced via her friend Lady Furness

1931- 1934 – The American divorcee and the heir to the throne see each other regularly at various parties 

August 1934 – Wallis admits she and Edward are no longer just friends, after joining him on a cruise 

January 1936 – King George V dies. Edward asks Wallis to watch the proclamation of his accession with him from St. James’s Palace

August 1936 – The pair enjoy a cruise around the Adriatic sea with friends. Details of their relationship appear in the American press

December 11, 1936 – Edward announces his abdication

June 3, 1937 – The couple get married in the south of France. Wallis was formally known as the Duchess of Windsor, but was not allowed to share her husband’s title of ‘Royal Highness.’   

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‘He was inside the room and at the head of the table. He was on the throne.’

‘Were his book ill-constructed and ill-spelt, it would still be remarkable. But, in fact, it is brilliantly written. Time after time a situation or a personality is touched off in one illuminating phrase.’

Edward’s most illuminating words centred around his feelings about his royal status, where he also touched on his service in the British Army in the First World War.

He said: ‘The idea that my birth and title should somehow set me apart from and above other people struck me as wrong.

‘If the levelling process of Osborne, Dartmouth and oxford and the democracy of the battlefields taught me anything, it was, firstly, that my desires and interests were much the same as those of other people , and secondly, that, however hard I tried, my capacity was somehow not appreciably above the standards of the fiercely competitive world outside palace walls… I suppose that, without quite understanding why, I was in unconscious rebellion against my position. That is what comes, perhaps, of sending and impressionable prince to school and war’

He felt that his investiture as the Prince of Wales at Caernarvon in 1911 – a ceremony which Prince Charles went through in 1969 – was a ‘preposterous rig’.

He said that, once the day was over, he made a ‘painful discovery’ about himself.

‘It was that, while I was prepared to fulfil my role in all this pomp and ritual, I recoiled from anything that tended to set me up as a person requiring homage,’ he said.

The Duke even claimed that, if the choice ‘had been left to me’ he may not have ‘consciously chosen the Throne as the next most desirable goal of my aspirations’.

He added: ‘But not to wish to be King was something else. I wanted to be a successful King, though a King in a modern way’. 

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

News of the Duke of Windsor’s memoir was reported in the Daily Mail on September 27, 1951. Reviewer George Murray said in the edition: ‘He had no need to keep an ear to the keyhole, or to hide under the table to learn what the kings and queens and princes were talking about. ‘He was inside the room and at the head of the table. He was on the throne.’ ‘Were his book ill-constructed and ill-spelt, it would still be remarkable. But, in fact, it is brilliantly written. Time after time a situation or a personality is touched off in one illuminating phrase’ 

His reference to his desire to update the monarchy and his feelings about his status as a royal were echoed nearly 20 years later by Wallis when she said in the couple’s joint televised interview with the BBC in 1970 that her husband had been ‘ahead of his time’ as King.

‘I think he had lots of pep and was ahead of his time. I think he wanted to establish things… not ready for them really perhaps,’ she said.

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

The edition which bore the coverage of the Duke’s book also featured a news report about King George VI’s ailing health

Edward’s relationship with Wallis, who had been twice married before her union with him, was a scandal when news first emerged of it.

His proposition to marry her – whilst divorce proceedings with her second husband were still ongoing – sparked a constitutional crisis which culminated in Edward’s decision to abdicate.

In his memoir, he described how Prime Minister Baldwin came to see him when Wallis filed for divorce from her husband, the shipbroker Ernest Aldrich Simpson.

He said he was ‘perturbed’ by the PM’s conversation with him, in which the Duke claimed Baldwin said: “I believe I know what the people would tolerate and what they would not”– a reference to his expressed wish to marry Wallis once her divorce was settled.

The Duke then tore into the Conservative politician as he expressed his despair at his lack of power in the situation.

‘Clear to the end, Mr Baldwin in his exchanges with me followed with scrupulous exactitude the constitutional rhetoric which preserves the fiction of kingly authority,’ he wrote.

‘It was always my ministers who would not let me do what I wished. It was always with his humble duty that he did what he wished.

‘The Prime minister controlled all the levers of power. He could bargain with the opposition. He could canvass members of Parliament.

‘He could exert party pressure for the support of the newspapers. He could even consult the Dominion Premiers in his own terms.’

The Duke added: ‘He could do all this and more…. I had to stand silent. How lonely is a Monarch in a struggle with a shrewd Prime Minister backed by all the apparatus of the modern State!’

Edward also touched on the role of the then Archbishop of Canterbury, Cosmo Gordon Lang, in the 1936 crisis.

The churchman was widely condemned for a speech he made after Edward had stepped down as King, in which he said: ‘From God he received a high and sacred trust. Yet by his own will he has … surrendered the trust.’

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

Royal historian Robert Jobson told MailOnline that the work was ‘much more important’ than the memoir which Prince Harry is set to publish next year – because as an ex-King, the Duke ‘had more gravitas’ than the Duke of Sussex (pictured)

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

Harry revealed via publisher Penguin Random House yesterday that he was writing his book ‘not as the prince I was born but as the man I have become’. The work is set to delve further into the breakdown in his relationship with his family and brother Prince William, which led to his and wife Meghan Markle’s decision to give up their royal duties and move to California at the start of last year

He added that the King’s motive had been ‘a craving for private happiness’ that he had tried to get ‘in a manner inconsistent with the Christian principles of marriage.’

Writing of Lang, Edward said that ‘behind’ the politicians’ decisions, ‘I suspected was a shadowy, hovering presence, the Archbishop of Canterbury.’

He added: ‘Curiously enough, I did not once see him throughout this period. He stood aside until the fateful fabric had been woven and the crisis was over.

‘Yet from beginning to end I had a disquieting feeling that he was invisibly and noiselessly about.’

The final passage in his book also centred around his relationship with Wallis, who he finally married in 1937.

‘Though it has proved my fate to sacrifice my cherished British heritage along with all the years in its service, I today draw comfort from the knowledge that time has long since sanctified a true and faithful union,’ he said.

Beyond the endless interest that there was for Edward to speak of the events that led to him giving up the throne, he also opened up about his childhood and his relationship with his father, King George V, and mother, Queen Mary.

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

The closing words of the Duke’s memoir centred around his decision to give up the throne so he could marry Ms Simpson. He spoke of how ‘love had triumphed over politics’ and that although it proved to be his ‘fate’ to ‘sacrifice my cherished British heritage’, he drew comfort that the decision had ‘long since sanctified a true and faithful union. Above: The Duke and Duchess featured on the cover of LIFE Magazine together in 1950, the year before his book came out. The Duke wore a smart striped suit whilst the Duchess donned glamorous jewellery for the photoshoot 

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

Edward’s proposal to marry Wallis – whilst divorce proceedings with her second husband were still ongoing – sparked a constitutional crisis which culminated in Edward’s decision to abdicate. Above: His letter announcing his abdication

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

The solemn King Edward VIII giving his abdication broadcast to the nation and the Empire, on December 11th, 1936

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

The Duke felt that his investiture as the Prince of Wales at Caernarvon in 1911 – a ceremony echoed by Prince Charles’s own investiture in 1969 – was a ‘preposterous rig’. He said that, once the day was over, he made a ‘painful discovery’ about himself. ‘It was that, while I was prepared to fulfil my role in all this pomp and ritual, I recoiled from anything that tended to set me up as a person requiring homage,’ he said

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

He described how his mother ‘smoothed things over’ after there was a ‘family blow-up’ following his investiture as Prince of Wales. He said she told him: ‘Your friends will understand that as a prince you are obliged to do certain things that may seem a little silly’. Above: The then Prince of Wales at his investiture, walking hand in hand with his father 

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

Speaking in his book of his childhood, he said: ‘My boyhood was a strict one because my father was strict in his own life and habits… He had the Victorian’s sense of probity, moral responsibility, and love of domesticity,’ he said. ‘He believed in God, in the invincibility of the Royal Navy, and the essential rightness of whatever was British… The concept of duty was drilled into me, and I never had the sense that the days belonged to me alone’. Above: A young Edward with the then Prince George and his wife Mary 

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

Queen Mary is seen above playing hostess to her son when he visited her in 1945, eight years before her death at the age of 85

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

In his memoir, the Duke (pictured left during the First World War) criticised Baldwin (right) when he expressed his despair at his own lack of power during the Abdication Crisis. He said: ‘Clear to the end, Mr Baldwin in his exchanges with me followed with scrupulous exactitude the constitutional rhetoric which preserves the fiction of kingly authority,’ he wrote. ‘It was always my ministers who would not let me do what I wished. It was always with his humble duty that he did what he wished. The Prime minister controlled all the levers of power. He could bargain with the opposition. He could canvass members of Parliament. He could exert party pressure for the support of the newspapers. He could even consult the Dominion Premiers in his own terms’

‘My boyhood was a strict one because my father was strict in his own life and habits… He had the Victorian’s sense of probity, moral responsibility, and love of domesticity,’ he said.

‘He believed in God, in the invincibility of the Royal Navy, and the essential rightness of whatever was British… The concept of duty was drilled into me, and I never had the sense that the days belonged to me alone.’

He added: ‘One theme that he inculcated into us was that we must never get the idea that we were different from or better than other people… and he literally pounded good manners into us… but with Mama life was less severe’.

He described how his mother ‘smoothed things over’ after there was a ‘family blow-up’ following his investiture as Prince of Wales.

He said she told him: ‘Your friends will understand that as a prince you are obliged to do certain things that may seem a little silly.’   

Speaking to MailOnline today about the Duke’s book, historian Mr Jobson said: ‘It was a bestseller at the time, it went around the world. 

‘Historically it is a very interesting memoir because it covers all sorts of period from his life as Prince of Wales and the whole period of the abdication. 

‘He was an interesting man and very erudite, and because he was a former king he had more gravitas. Harry’s will be an interesting book but i don’t know if its comparable really to Duke of Windsor’s story,’ he added.  

After his abdication, Edward was made the Duke of Windsor by his brother – the new King George VI – and granted the style of His Royal Highness.

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

The Daily Mail’s coverage on December 11, 1936, reported King Edward’s speech announcing his decision to abdicate

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

The newspaper reported how the former king had ‘renounced the Throne and all his titles and will leave the country to-night’

However, after their 1937 marriage and decision to settle in France, Edward was upset by the King’s decision to issue Letters Patent which denied Wallis the style of Her Royal Highness.

Edward received a tax-free allowance from his brother which went some way to maintaining his and Wallis’s lavish lifestyle. He also made money from illegal currency trading.

The difficult relationship which Edward had with his family after his abdication was depicted extensively in Peter Morgan’s Netflix drama The Crown.

But when asked by Kenneth Harris in 1970 if she had any regrets, Wallis tactfully replied, ‘Oh about certain things yes. I wish it could have been different but I’m extremely happy.

‘Naturally you’ve have had some hard times but who hasn’t? You just have to learn to live with that.’

In 1940, Edward was appointed as Governor of the Bahamas – a role which he held until 1945.

In response to Harris’s question about whether he would have liked to have had another job afterwards, he said he ‘offered my services’ but was never handed a new role.

His words in his book about his feelings of ‘unconscious rebellion’ were echoed in the BBC interview, when he was asked what he meant by the ‘Establishment’.

He said: ‘The establishment was a new word to me until about 15 years ago, when I heard it and asked people to explain it to me.

‘It’s not an easy word to explain. It’s rather an obscure word. But it must have always existed. I think it means authority, authority of the law, of the church, the monarch to a certain extent.’

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

His reference to his desire to update the monarchy and his feelings about his status as a royal were echoed nearly 20 years later by Wallis (right) when she said in the couple’s joint televised interview with the BBC in 1970 (above) that her husband had been ‘ahead of his time’ as King 

He said that, whilst he was not part of the establishment, his father, King George V, ‘certainly was’, as was his brother.

Edward admitted that he ‘collided’ with the establishment, although ‘not very violently’.

And even if he had not fallen in love with Wallis and instead remained single, Edward added that his ‘collision’ would ‘definitely’ have been ‘inevitable’.

‘But not in a bad way,’ he said. ‘I think maybe, I don’t know, perhaps I’m being conceited but I think it might’ve helped the establishment too.

‘I think it might’ve revived the thinking of the Establishment.

‘The Establishment has a conservative aspect I think. I think it revivifies itself. But I think it probably does need a little lead from the Monarch.’

Netflix’s The Crown depicted how, in May 1972 – ten days before his death – Edward was visited by the Queen and Prince Philip.

She spoke to him alone before appearing with just the Duchess for a photograph. The Duke died on May 28, less than a month before his 78th birthday.

His body was returned to Britain, where it lay in state at Windsor Castle’s St George’s Chapel before his funeral.

Prince Harry ‘says he DOESN’T need Queen’s permission’ to write $20m Megxit memoir as Royal aides fear more ‘truth bombs’ and ‘poor me introspection’ in tell-all ‘book by Harry, written by Meghan’

By Martin Robinson, Chief Reporter for MailOnline and Rebecca English, Royal Editor for the Daily Mail

Prince Harry didn’t feel he needed permission from Buckingham Palace to write his $20million Megxit memoir, his spokesman declared today.

The decision to write a tell-all autobiography has been branded a ‘moneymaking exercise at the expense of his blood family’ by royal experts and insiders who predicted it would be ‘a book by Harry, as written by Meghan.’

Harry, 36, did not warn his grandmother, father or brother about the tell-all book until ‘moments before it became public’ in a sign that his relationship with the Royal Family did not improve during his visit to unveil Princess Diana’s statue in London earlier this month, it was claimed today.

The Sussexes’ spokesman told the BBC that Harry would not be expected to obtain permission for the project from Buckingham Palace – but told his family including the Queen ‘very recently’ – and it is not yet clear if royal officials will get to see the finished book before its release in late 2022 by publisher Penguin Random House. MailOnline has asked Harry’s LA team to comment.

Harry said last night: ‘I’m writing this not as the prince I was born but as the man I have become’. Responding to his bombshell statement signed ‘Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex’, broadcaster Kirstie Allsopp replied: ‘In which case stop using the title to sell books’ and one royal insider said tartly: ‘A book by Harry, as written by Meghan.’ 

In his latest column for MailOnline, Piers Morgan today urged the Queen to strip Harry and Meghan of all their titles, calling the book a betrayal too far and accusing them of turning Her Majesty’s world-famous motto of ‘never complain, never explain’ into ‘always complain, always explain, never stop whining’.

The Queen, Prince Charles and Prince William are said to have been completely blindsided by Harry’s shock announcement that he has been secretly working on his as yet untitled memoirs with Pulitzer-winning ghostwriter J. R. Moehringer for a year. 

Another source revealed that the announcement had provoked ‘much eye-rolling’, adding: ‘I think everyone is just tired of being angry when it comes to those two. They have spent the last 18 months doing everything they promised Her Majesty they wouldn’t do – making a living off their previous lives and status as members of the Royal Family. It’s depressingly predictable, unfortunately.’ 

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s ‘truth bombing’ began in March with their extraordinary 90-minute interview with Oprah Winfrey where they accused the Royal Family of racism towards Archie and ignoring cries for help from a depressed Meghan when she was suicidal and pregnant.

In the chaotic aftermath of the show, watched by almost 100million people worldwide, the couple claimed this would be their ‘final word’ on Megxit, only to continue talking about it in more damaging detail over the coming months. 

And now the royals will be dreading the release of the book next year, which experts predict will be ‘more ‘poor me’ introspection and more excuses to justify his decision to quit royal life’ and ‘the last thing the Queen, Prince Charles and Prince William will want to hear’.

Royal author Phil Dampier wrote in the Express today: ‘They will be in despair that Harry – doubtless prompted by Meghan – just won’t leave it alone for a while.  It is obvious that when Harry came over for the unveiling of Diana’s statue earlier this month, no meaningful progress was made in his relationship with his father or brother. If he respected their opinion, he wouldn’t do this book because they wouldn’t approve of it.

‘Harry wants to present himself as a mature family man who has learnt from his mistakes and become a wise old sage. But I fear many other people will see this as yet another moneymaking exercise at the expense of his blood family’.    

Harry’s biographer Angela Levin said: ‘I feel he risks looking like a traitor to the Royal Family. I don’t believe it’s going to be all honey and sweetness, I think he’s going to smash again. I don’t know why, does he want to destroy his family? Does he feel so revengeful that he has to take yet another knock after Oprah and after Finding Freedom. 

‘I don’t quite get it, why he doesn’t want to move on, enjoy his life, he’s making pots of money. He’s in love with his wife, he’s got two children, a girl and a boy. But why is he so negative about his past, he can’t leave it alone. It’s like a cat or dog, tearing at something to destroy it.’

As the Sussexes promised to tell their Megxit story again, it also emerged: 

  • Harry told his family including the Queen about the book ‘moments before’ the publisher released the news, it has been claimed; 
  • Experts told DailyMail.com that Harry will have been given ‘at least’ a $20million advance for his memoir – one of the largest in literary history;
  • The author ghostwriting Prince Harry’s new book is J.R. Moehringer, who may have been introduced to Harry by George Clooney, who is turning Moehringer’s own memoir, The Tender Bar, into a movie next year;
, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

Prince Harry has been secretly working on book for nearly year which he has sold to Penguin Random House

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

Sources close to Prince Charles (pictured in Scilly today) said Harry’s father was ‘surprised’ at the news and that the royals had not been warned in advance that a book was in the offing until the news broke

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

Harry , 36, did not warn his grandmother, father or brother about the tell-all book until ‘moments before it became public’ in a sign that his relationship with the Royal Family did not improve during his visit to unveil Princess Diana ‘s statue in London earlier this month 

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

A statement from the publisher states: ‘Prince Harry will share, for the very first time, the definitive account of the experiences, adventures, losses, and life lessons that have helped shape him’

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

The first draft of the manuscript, currently untitled, is said to be almost completely written and is due to be submitted in October 

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

Prince Harry has been working with Pulitzer-winning ghostwriter J. R. Moehringer

Prince Harry promises readers an ‘accurate and wholly truthful’ book written ‘not as the prince I was born but as the man I have become’

Harry said the memoir, to be published by Penguin Random House, will be written ‘not as the prince’ he was, but as the man he has ‘become’.

He said, ‘I’m writing this not as the prince I was born but as the man I have become.

‘I’ve worn many hats over the years, both literally and figuratively, and my hope is that in telling my story – the highs and lows, the mistakes, the lessons learned – I can help show that no matter where we come from, we have more in common than we think.

‘I’m deeply grateful for the opportunity to share what I’ve learned over the course of my life so far and excited for people to read a first hand account of my life that’s accurate and wholly truthful.’

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Prince Harry did not warn his father Charles about his plan to write an explosive Megxit memoir which will hit the shelves next year, it has been claimed.

Harry’s spokesman said that he told his family including the Queen ‘very recently’ – but a source told The Sun: ‘Harry scrambled to contact his family only when he knew the story was coming out — just moments before it became public.’  

The Duke of Sussex, 36, has been secretly working on the book about his life in the royal family for nearly a year, which he has since sold to Penguin Random House.

Prince Harry has been collaborating with Pulitzer-winning ghostwriter J. R. Moehringer in a rare move from a senior member of the royal family.

The first draft of the manuscript, currently untitled, is said to be almost completely written and is due to be submitted in October. 

Royal experts questioned Harry’s motive for writing the book, pointing out he is already wealthy and has previously spoken at length about Megxit.

Royal expert Richard Fitzwilliams told MailOnline Harry was ‘exorcising his demons’ with the book – but queried how one-sided it would be, adding: ‘Will it be his truth or the truth? And will they be the same or different?’

Experts have told DailyMail.com that Harry will have been given ‘at least’ a $20million (£14.6million) advance for the memoir with millions more to be made in sales. Any ‘proceeds’ will go to charity, the prince has said.

Prince Harry said in a statement last night: ‘I’ve worn many hats over the years, both literally and figuratively, and my hope is that in telling my story— the highs and lows, the mistakes, the lessons learned — I can help show that no matter where we come from, we have more in common than we think. 

‘I’m deeply grateful for the opportunity to share what I’ve learned over the course of my life so far and excited for people to read a firsthand account of my life that’s accurate and wholly truthful.’    

But sources close to Prince Charles said Harry’s father was ‘surprised’ at the news and that the royals had not been warned in advance that a book was in the offing until the news broke on Monday.  

Harry’s suggestion that he would be writing about his ‘mistakes’ and the ‘lessons’ he has learned also raised eyebrows.

Royal sources said they believed that the prince had ‘never been one to willingly admit’ any mistakes and had spent the last three years ‘blaming everyone except himself and his wife’ for the catastrophic breakdown in relations with his family.  

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

Charles and Camilla continue their royal duties at Porthcressa Beach in St Mary’s, Isles of Scilly today

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

The proceeds of the deal are likely to be worth millions and, although the exact financial terms were not disclosed, Prince Harry will donate proceeds to charity, according to Random House 

Did Harry’s pal George Clooney introduce him to his ghostwriter? Pulitzer-winning author is currently working with Hollywood legend on film project about his own life 

The author ghostwriting Prince Harry‘s new book is J.R. Moehringer, a Pulitzer-winning journalist and writer who previously worked with Andre Agassi and the co-founder of Nike on their own money-spinning memoirs. 

It’s unclear how the pair were put in touch but it’s possible Harry was introduced to him by George Clooney, who is turning Moehringer’s own memoir, The Tender Bar, into a movie next year. 

Harry and Meghan are friends with George and Amal Clooney. The Clooney’s gave Meghan a ride on a private jet back from America to London in 2019 after Archie’s baby shower. 

They attended Harry and Meghan’s wedding and ‘had dinners’ with the pair when they were still living in the UK. 

Clooney is directing The Tender Bar, a film adaptation of Moehringer’s 2004 memoir. The film stars Ben Affleck and will be released next year.  

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Harry’s ‘power ghostwriter’: Pulitzer-winning ex-LA Times journalist who co-wrote memoirs for Andre Agassai and Nike CEO Phil Knight has been working on book with the prince for a year

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

, How &#8216;lonely&#8217; Edward VIII shocked world with his explosive 1951 autobiography, Nzuchi Times

Harry has been quietly working with novelist and journalist JR Moehringer to put his thoughts to paper for the last year.

Described by US media as a ‘power ghostwriter’, the New York native, 56, first wrote his own memoir, The Tender Bar, where he recounted being brought up by his single mother in his grandfather’s house and meeting a cast of characters in the bar where his uncle worked.

It was after reading the deeply personal story from the Yale graduate that tennis star Andre Agassi sought out Moehringer to tell his own tale.

Agassi’s 2009 book, Open: An Autobiography, was not the usual sportsman’s tome, espousing a love for the game that brought him great fame and wealth as others have done.

Instead it made headlines when the eight-time Grand Slam winner admitted: ‘I play tennis for a living even though I hate tennis, hate it with a dark and secret passion and always have.’

Moehringer then went on to ghostwrite the life story of Phil Knight, co-founder of sports giant Nike.

But 2016’s Shoe Dog, while leaning heavily on Knight’s family influences and personal anecdotes, was criticised by some reviewers for largely skipping over Nike’s controversies and offering few regrets.

Moehringer’s work has won numerous awards, including the 2000 Pulitzer, America’s top journalism honour, for feature writing.

He has worked for the Rocky Mountain News, the New York Times and the LA Times during a career spanning four decades.

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Prince Harry has signed up to the book deal despite issuing repeated calls for his family’s privacy to be respected.

A statement from the publisher about the upcoming book reads: ‘In an intimate and heartfelt memoir from one of the most fascinating and influential global figures of our time, Prince Harry will share, for the very first time, the definitive account of the experiences, adventures, losses, and life lessons that have helped shape him.

‘Covering his lifetime in the public eye from childhood to the present day, including his dedication to service, the military duty that twice took him to the frontlines of Afghanistan, and the joy he has found in being a husband and father, Prince Harry will offer an honest and captivating personal portrait, on that shows readers that behind everything they think they know lies an inspiring, courageous and uplifting human story.’  

Markus Dohle, CEO of Penguin Random House, said: ‘All of us at Penguin Random House are thrilled to publish Prince Harry’s literary memoir and have him join the world-renowned leaders, icons, and change-makers we have been privileged to publish over the years.

‘Prince Harry has harnessed his extraordinary life experience as a prince, a soldier, and a knowledgeable advocate for social issues, establishing himself as a global leader recognized for his courage and openness.

‘It is for that reason we’re excited to publish his honest and moving story.’

Penguin Random House said it has bought the global rights to the memoir and audiobook – expected to be published in late 2022 as it threatens to bring a dramatic end to the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee year.

Robert Jobson, author of the bestseller Prince Philip’s Century, has commented on Harry’s book deal and drawn parallels with former King Edward VIII.

‘As night follows day, this was always going to happen,’ he told MailOnline.

‘It will become an international bestseller, but at what cost to the monarchy? There will be nowhere to hide. It is not the first time a ‘exiled’ senior royal has written a memoir… the former King Edward VIII wrote one.

‘His book – A King’s Story: The Memoirs of HRH the Duke of Windsor, KG – was published to a media storm in the 50s. It caused a sensation.

‘But this is bound to cause mayhem amongst the House of Windsor. If Harry, which seems inevitable, goes into detail about mental health issues involving his wife and alleged racism at the heart of the royal family, it will be hugely damaging to the House of Windsor and the Monarchy as an institution.

‘Harry is already hugely rich and famous so apart from damaging his family – which a book like this will inevitably do, I am not sure what he is trying to achieve. Whatever he says will lead to conflict.

‘No wonder there is a rift between the royal brothers and problems with his father. How can any bridges be built when he is doing this? I cannot see any royal rift ever being healed at this rate.’

And others were also quick to question Harry’s motivations with Piers Morgan tweeting: ‘Ready to tell his story? Prince Privacy hasn’t stopped yapping, whining & trashing his family all bloody year.’ 

Royal expert Richard Fitzwilliams told MailOnline that Harry has been using his media appearances as a ‘form of therapy’.

‘It’s not being published globally until late 2022. I do think that it is very important that an accommodation should be reached between the royal family and the Sussexes between now and then. 

‘[Harry] is donating the proceeds to charity. It is however worth remembering that the knowledge he is writing it and that it could be explosive and that it will be widely read worldwide is something members of the royal family will be bearing in mind when dealing with the Sussexes between now and then. 

‘The Sussexes problem is they keep going public. Harry has an extraordinary habit of getting headlines – Oprah, James Corden, celebrity podcasts, AppleTV and he sees these appearances as a kind of therapy. 

‘How can Harry build any bridges doing this?’: Royal expert Robert Jobson says Prince’s ‘hugely damaging’ Megxit memoir will cause ‘mayhem’ in his family and deepen rifts with Charles and William 

Prince Harry’s explosive memoir about the royal family will only ‘further damage’ his relationship with his brother and father, an expert has claimed.

The Duke of Sussex, 36, has been secretly working on a book for nearly a year which he has since sold to Penguin Random House.

It will tell the story from his childhood growing up in palaces, to his time in Afghanistan and his decision to leave the royal family in 2020. Sources close to Prince Charles said Harry’s father was ‘surprised’ at the news and that the royals had not been warned that a book was in the offing until the news broke tonight.

Speaking to FEMAIL, royal expert Robert Jobson said the book will only ‘lead to conflict’ and will be ‘hugely damaging to the House of Windsor and Monarchy as an institution.

The author, who wrote bestseller ‘Prince Philip’s Century’, added that Harry is already ‘rich and famous’ and the book serves no purpose but to ’cause damage’.

‘As night follows day, this was always going to happen,’ he told FEMAIL.

‘It will become an international bestseller, but at what cost to the monarchy? There will be nowhere to hide’.

He also compared Harry to his great-grandfather’s brother Edward, who abdicated so he could marry American divorcee Wallis Simpson.

‘It is not the first time an ‘exiled’ senior royal has written a memoir, the former King Edward VIII wrote one.

‘His book ‘A King’s Story: The Memoirs of HRH the Duke of Windsor, KG’ was published to a media storm in the 50s. It caused a sensation.

‘But this is bound to cause mayhem amongst the House of Windsor.

‘If Harry, which seems inevitable, goes into detail about mental health issues involving his wife and alleged racism at the heart of the royal family, it will be hugely damaging to the House of Windsor and the Monarchy as an institution.

‘Harry is already hugely rich and famous so apart from damaging his family – which a book like this will inevitably do, I am not sure what he is trying to achieve. Whatever he says will lead to conflict.

‘No wonder there is a rift between the royal brothers and problems with his father.

‘How can any bridges be built when he is doing this? ‘.

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‘It’s very difficult when you’re dealing with the Sussexes, that you don’t know what’s coming next. It might not be published until 2022. 

‘It’s so far in the future, it’s a potential lever if they want something from the royal family.  

‘He’s exorcising his demons, and he doesn’t see it as disruptive at all. He sees it as becoming a new person – escaping being trapped like Charles and William.

‘But he’s still sixth-in-line to the throne, a significant royal even if he’s not a working royal. He wants an audience to understand how he can become a new him, and we don’t know that will be yet.

‘Will it be his truth or the truth? And will they be the same or different?

‘A lot of his Oprah interview didn’t pass a fact check, and it’s difficult for the outside world to tell what is true, which is a big concern.

‘They still see themselves as victims, my hope is that it’s constructive and won’t lead to further revelations that will damage his family. It appears it was written before the rift was healed – so it could be extraordinary.

‘He’s saying the book is written from the the perspective of ‘the man he’s become’, and this is certainly what he feels at the moment.

‘It’s hard to see exactly what Harry and Meghan want and we might not know until we see what in the memoir is going to include and what might embarrass his father and what’s going to be about their time as working royals.

‘He has talked a lot about healing, but what do the Sussexes want for the royal family?’    

The book deal is likely to only increase the tensions between the Duke of Sussex and the rest of The Firm as the Royal Family brace for further painful revelations.

Prince Harry has been separated from brother William, 39, by a rift that began in March 2019 when the Duke of Cambridge reportedly threw Harry and wife Meghan Markle out of Kensington Palace over the alleged bullying of staff – with the Sussexes breaking up their joint foundation. 

The gulf was exacerbated when the couple, who stepped down from royal duties in early 2020, moved away from the UK to start a new life after citing the desire for a more private life.

But just four months ago Harry and Meghan, 39, made worldwide news during their explosive two-hour interview with Oprah Winfrey near the couple’s home in Montecito, California, which was viewed by more than 17 million people in the US and over 11 million in Britain.

Meghan spoke of feeling lonely and nearly suicidal at six months pregnant before the couple left England and Harry acknowledged tension with his father, Prince Charles, over his decision to step back from his royal duties and his marriage to the biracial American actor. 

‘There is a lot to work through there,’ Harry said about his relationship with his father, who was divorced from Diana, Princess of Wales, at the time of her fatal car accident in 1997. 

‘I feel really let down. He’s been through something similar. He knows what pain feels like. And Archie (Harry and Meghan’s son) is his grandson. I will always love him, but there is a lot of hurt that has happened.’

Harry told Winfrey that he felt trapped by royal life and that his family cut off him financially and took away his security.  

He also acknowledged his relations were strained with his brother, Prince William.

‘I was trapped, but I didn’t know I was trapped,’ Harry said, before adding, ‘My father and my brother, they are trapped.’

Meghan also claimed that Kate Middleton left her in tears during a row over bridesmaid dresses and Harry accused his father Prince Charles of refusing to take his calls when the pair moved to the US. 

In one of the most shocking sections of the Oprah interview, the duchess claimed that Harry was asked by a close relative ‘how dark’ their unborn baby would be.

She added that the unnamed royal had raised ‘concerns and conversations about how dark his skin might be when he’s born’.

Meghan Markle will face an ‘awkward reunion’ with The Firm if Lilibet is christened at Windsor 

Meghan Markle could be faced with an ‘awkward’ reunion with the Royal Family if her daughter Lilibet gets christened in Windsor, a royal expert has claimed.

According to royal insiders, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s daughter Lilibet Diana could follow in the footsteps of older brother Archie and be christened in St George’s Chapel in Windsor with the Queen present.

However, royal expert Russell Myers has warned that it will be ‘definitely awkward’ as tensions are still running ‘very high within the family’.

‘It will be definitely awkward,’ he said, speaking to Today. ‘Meghan isn’t flavour of the month with the family. Certainly, the family have always said they will be much-loved members of the family. 

‘However, we’re still talking about the fallout of the Oprah Winfrey interview, Emmy or no Emmy nomination.

‘The tensions are still running very, very high within the family, indeed.’

A source previously told the Daily Mail: ‘Harry told several people that they want to have Lili christened at Windsor, just like her brother Archie.

‘They are happy to wait until circumstances allow.’

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The couple refused to identify the person concerned as it would be ‘too damaging to them’.  

Buckingham Palace said at the time that the royal family were ‘saddened’ to hear how challenging the couple’s lives had been.

In the days that followed, Prince William also uncharacteristically hit back at his brother’s claims while visiting a school in east London with wife Kate Middleton. 

Sky News reporter Inzamam Rashid asked: ‘Can you just let me know, is the Royal Family a racist family?’

William, who was wearing a face mask at the time, firmly said: ‘We’re very much not a racist family.’

Kensington Palace later declined to comment and said that the duke had said all he wished to say.   

Harry and Meghan have since faced criticism for repeatedly complaining about their own privacy being violated at the same time as sharing damaging details about private conversations they have had with senior royals in front of a global TV audience numbering in the tens of millions.

They have also been accused of ‘hypocrisy’ for releasing photos of private family moments on Instagram – prompting press stories of their private lives – while complaining about media intrusion after coverage that paints them in a bad light. 

Last month, Meghan published her own picture book ‘The Bench’ through Random House Books for Young Readers. 

It was inspired by a poem the Duchess of Sussex wrote for Prince Harry on Father’s Day, the month after Archie was born, and explores the ‘special bond between father and son’ as ‘seen through a mother’s eyes’.

The Bench did feature as number one on The New York Times Bestseller list for children’s picture books but failed to hit the UK Official Top 50 chart after selling just 3,212 copies in its first week – being beaten by footballer Marcus Rashford’s self-help guide. 

And this latest venture comes just weeks after the pair, who are parents to two-year-old Archie, welcomed Lilibet ‘Lili’ Diana Mountbatten-Windsor on June 4 at 11.40am in Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital.

The couple had said they would ‘both take some proper time off’ to adjust to life as a family-of-four before stepping back into their various business engagements. 

Prince Harry’s paternity leave has meant taking time out from his executive position at a Silicon Valley start-up that claims to be worth $1.7billion.

For the couple the time-off also meant temporarily stepping back from their multi-million-pound deals with Netflix and Spotify – which Harry told Oprah Winfrey he was persuaded to sign when he was ‘literally cut off financially’ from the Royal Family. 

It was revealed last month that the couple have so far broadcast just 35 minutes of podcast content on Spotify as part of their £18million deal.  

The Sussexes were last heard on their Archewell Audio Spotify podcast for the 2020 Christmas special, and the platform had planned for ‘a full-scale launch of shows’ in 2021.

It is understood that the couple will be paid the full £18million fee after their duties have been met, The Sun said.

Buckingham Palace declined to comment on Harry’s memoir when approached by MailOnline.  

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