, ‘Ring of fire’ solar eclipse lights up northern skies, Nzuchi Times

‘Ring of fire’ solar eclipse lights up northern skies

, ‘Ring of fire’ solar eclipse lights up northern skies, Nzuchi Times

The solar eclipse as seen in New York during the early hours on Thursday. (Islam Dogru/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

Skygazers in the Northern Hemisphere on Thursday were treated to a “ring of fire,” or annular, eclipse, when the moon passed in front of the sun in line with Earth, creating the appearance of a fiery ring.

Just how much of the eclipse was visible depended on where you were — and whether you were awake.

In the United States, some on the East Coast were able to catch part of it just after sunrise. In New York, a partial eclipse was visible at 5:32 a.m. ET.

, ‘Ring of fire’ solar eclipse lights up northern skies, Nzuchi Times, ‘Ring of fire’ solar eclipse lights up northern skies, Nzuchi Times

The sun rises next to the Statue of Liberty during the eclipse. (Gary Hershorn/Getty Images)

The full “ring,” or annularity, was visible only in parts of northern Canada, Greenland and Russia, with a maximum eclipse visible in the north polar region at 6:41 a.m. ET and lasting just under four minutes.

If you weren’t lucky enough to be near the North Pole, don’t worry: The eclipse was livestreamed — and photographed.

And while Thursday’s event was the only annular eclipse on the 2021 calendar, there will be a total eclipse visible for parts of the Southern Hemisphere on Dec. 4.

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